The Second International Conference
of the African Marine Waste Network.
Towards Zero Plastics to the Seas of Africa.
23 – 27 MAY 2022

About the conference

The second International Conference of the African Marine Waste Network (AMWN) programme of Sustainable Seas Trust (SST), titled Towards Zero Plastics to the Seas of Africa, represents the premier event in SST’s calendar. 

The conference will focus on the actions and interventions that need to take place at every step of the value chain – including measurements of progress, social and economic considerations, municipal actions, capacity building and education, research, policy and legislation, collaboration, and networking – to move Africa towards the vision of no plastics entering the environment and, ultimately, the seas.

Cost is R3000 per person and does not include transportation or accommodation. It does, however, include the conference attendance fee, tea, coffee and light snacks twice daily, daily lunch and the reception cocktail dinner and gala dinner.

THE WORKSHOP SERIES

The preparatory workshop series, completed on the 12th of April 2022, was designed to ensure that key sections of what should be included in the Guidebook are inclusively discussed and transcribed into chapters. Each of these preparatory webinars have resulted in a detailed report which represents the first draft of each chapter of the Guidebook.

A draft of the Guidebook will be ready for inclusive discussion at the conference.

Catch up on the series to ensure you are ready to join the conversation by clicking on the links below.

Production and Consumption

Friday 10 Dec 2021
Online event, at 09:00 a.m. GMT until 12:30 p.m. GMT

Collection and Sorting

Tuesday 18 January 2022
Online event, at 09:00 a.m. GMT until 12:30 p.m. GMT

Recycling

Tuesday 1 February 2022
Online event, at 09:00 a.m. GMT until 12:30 p.m. GMT

Disposal

Tuesday 15 February 2022
Online event, at 09:00 a.m. GMT until 12:30 p.m. GMT

Mismanaged Waste & Municipal roles

Tuesday 1 March 2022
Online event, at 09:00 a.m. GMT until 12:30 p.m. GMT

Cross-cutting issues

Tuesday 15 March 2022
Online event, at 09:00 a.m. GMT until 12:30 p.m. GMT

Sea-Based Sources of Waste

Tuesday 29 March 2022
Online event, at 09:00 a.m. GMT until 12:30 p.m. GMT

Additional issues, if needed

Tuesday 12 April 2022
Online event, at 09:00 a.m. GMT until 12:30 p.m. GMT

OBJECTIVES, OUTPUTS
AND VALUES

Objective

The primary objective of the conference is producing a Guide to Developing National and Regional Action Plans, with a Decision-Making Framework for Management of Plastics in Africa, hereafter referred to as the Guidebook.

Outputs

The Guidebook will be a clear framework outlining the actions that must be taken locally within African countries, nationally and regionally, to combat plastic waste. In complete alignment with the call from UNEA and UNEP to assist African countries develop such plans, this output will guide decision-makers in Africa to the specific steps that can be adapted to the circumstances that exist in their countries, thereby explicitly contributing to the achievement of several Sustainable Development Goals.

Values

  • Focussed and action-oriented
  • Inclusive and engaging
  • Realistic yet aspirational
  • Innovative and forward-thinking

Background

Africa is the second most polluted continent. Costs of marine waste to Africa are estimated in the millions of dollars every year. While the exact amount of waste entering the sea from the African continent remains unknown, it is clear the rapid development of Africa has seen waste accumulation outpace management capacity. Waste from Africa enters the sea and becomes part of the global environment. Thus, marine waste problems in Africa are part of the shared global waste problem.

Specifically, marine pollution in African is a detriment to the continent’s economy, human health, wildlife, and environment, while contributing to the challenge of climate change. Without the necessary infrastructure to collect and process plastic waste at scale, and with a growing population, Africa must play its part in finding solutions to this increasing global problem.